AFA Michigan.org. American Family Association of Michigan  
Home
About AFA Michigan
Media Center
Links
Contact AFA Michigan
Support AFA Michigan
AFAMI News

Search


AFA-Michigan head sees racial unity among Katrina survivors

September 20, 2005

“(American Family Association of Michigan President Gary) Glenn observed that the national media has continued to emphasize race as a factor in the pace of delivering disaster relief. Yet he says he saw no racial division or animosity in southern Mississippi. Nevertheless, the pro-family leader says he has emphasized telling the victims of the hurricane, African Americans in particular, ‘that we’ve come all the way from Michigan to tell them that we care about them, and love them and want to help them.’ …He says he made a particular point of telling these people, ‘don’t believe what you hear on national television … we do care about you. It doesn’t matter what your skin color is. We care about you and want to help you.'”

————————

AGAPE PRESS
Tupelo, Mississippi
September 20, 2005

Katrina prompts comparisons between
religious and federal relief efforts

by Allie Martin

AGAPE PRESS — The head of the American Family Association of Michigan, his son, and other volunteers recently joined in relief efforts for hurricane victims on Mississippi’s Gulf Coast. Twelve people representing several denominations traveled from Michigan to Mississippi delivering ten tons of donated food items to hurricane victims.

Gary Glenn, president of the AFA of Michigan, says while national media is focused on New Orleans, the damage from Hurricane Katrina is even worse in Mississippi. The place that got hit the hardest by the storm itself, he asserts, was in the Magnolia State, a town called Waveland that he says was “wiped clean” by the storm.

“The only thing standing in Waveland,” Glenn notes, “is a stone wall with a mural of the city painted on it, and a bronze plaque on a bronze pole that says, ‘From the citizens of Waveland, with appreciation to all those who helped us rebuild from Hurricane Camille in 1969.’ It really is kind of tough to imagine what it would be like to be one of those people, to come back to where they used to live, and nothing at all be there.”

The Michigan group pitched in to help those displaced or otherwise affected by Hurricane Katrina. Meanwhile, Glenn observed that the national media has continued to emphasize race as a factor in the pace of delivering disaster relief. Yet he says he saw no racial division or animosity in southern Mississippi. Nevertheless, the pro-family leader says he has emphasized telling the victims of the hurricane, African Americans in particular, “that we’ve come all the way from Michigan to tell them that we care about them, and love them and want to help them.”

And in many cases, Glenn notes that he recognized a spirit of cooperation and camaraderie among the disaster survivors, among whom he often saw “black folk and white folk in the same car, coming up and asking for help.” He says he made a particular point of telling these people, “don’t believe what you hear on national television … we do care about you. It doesn’t matter what your skin color is. We care about you and want to help you.”

Glenn’s son turned 15 during the relief efforts. He and his father and the other volunteers sometimes worked 12-hour days in food distribution lines and doing other tasks. The AFA of Michigan spokesman says victims’ response to the aid and the message of caring has been “overwhelming — very appreciative.”

http://headlines.agapepress.org/archive/9/202005b.asp

Click here to visit Clean Hotels.com

Categories
Abortion
Eminent Domain
General
Homosexual Agenda
AFL-CIO
Boy Scouts
Public Health
In The News
Marriage
News Releases
Pornography
Public Schools and Universities
Religious Freedom
Religious Heritage

Click here to complain to the FCC