AFA Michigan.org. American Family Association of Michigan  
Home
About AFA Michigan
Media Center
Links
Contact AFA Michigan
Support AFA Michigan
AFAMI News

Search


Local affiliate airs controversial show

January 8, 2006

The reporter was advised, but did not report, that the writer of the TV show “The Book of Daniel” is openly involved in the homosexual lifestyle.

“Gary Glenn, president of the Michigan chapter of the AFA, said the organization has put forth several efforts to bring the issues of the show to people’s attention. ‘We do encourage TV station managers in Michigan to seriously consider the (offense) the broadcasting of this show will cause to the millions of people of faith in our state,’ Glenn said. Regardless of religious affiliation, some of the issues the show presents — most notably, the gay son — can portray religion in a bad light, Glenn said. ‘It’s clear that individuals promoting a homosexual agenda are going to use this show to paint the Christian faith as dysfunctional as possible,’ he said.”


THE CITIZEN-PATRIOT
Jackson, Michigan
January 7, 2006Local affiliate airs controversial show
by Aaron FoleyJACKSON, MI. — Despite concerns from area viewers, WILX-TV Channel 10 aired the premiere of “The Book of Daniel” Friday night, a show some say mocks Christianity and attacks family values.

The title character, Daniel, is an Episcopalian priest facing several issues, including a gay son, an alcoholic wife, a drug-dealing daughter, a lesbian sister-in-law who’s involved with the church secretary, and conversations with Jesus, who sometimes rides shotgun in Daniel’s car.

Six NBC affiliates — four in Kansas, one in Arkansas and one in Indiana — chose not to air the show. According to the American Family Association, NBC has gotten 600,000 e-mails protesting the show.

Mike King, WILX vice president and station manager, requested a viewing of the show before it aired because the amount of feedback kept growing.

“It’s a program that has a lot of modern-day issues that families are faced with wrapped in an Episcopal priest’s family,” King said. “I don’t believe it’s attacking a particular religion or Christianity at all.”

About 100 e-mails and phone calls about the show, which airs at 9 p.m. Fridays, came into the station before the show’s airing. King said the station rarely receives that much feedback on any program.

“There are many people that won’t like any particular program, but they ultimately have the choice whether to watch it or not,” King said. “Ratings will ultimately decide the success or failure of this program.”

Gary Glenn, president of the Michigan chapter of the AFA, said the organization has put forth several efforts to bring the issues of the show to people’s attention.

“We do encourage TV station managers in Michigan to seriously consider the effects the broadcasting of this show will cause to the millions of people of faith in our state,” Glenn said.

Regardless of religious affiliation, some of the issues the show presents — most notably, the gay son — can portray religion in a bad light, Glenn said.

“It’s clear that individuals promoting a homosexual agenda are going to use this show to paint the Christian faith as dysfunctional as possible,” he said.

Some local officials affiliated with the Episcopal Church had not noticed much of the early controversy surrounding the show, but instead see the show as portraying a family with problems.

Elise Cole, a deacon at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Jackson, said the show sounds pretty disastrous, but “all kinds of people have problems, including Christian people, clergy people,” Cole said. “I really can’t condemn a family I don’t know.”

The Rev. Chuck Swineheart, a priest at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Jackson, said the show could prove that religious officials aren’t much different from average citizens.

“It’s good in a sense that people realize that priests and pastors have problems, difficulties and challenges like other people do, and you have to come to grips with them,” Swineheart said.

“It’s kind of refreshing, I guess, to have that kind of exposure.”

Swineheart doesn’t foresee views of faith or religion changing because of the show.

“I don’t think a realistic portrayal of some of the problems that clergy have to live with makes fun of Christianity,” he said.

http://www.mlive.com/

Click here to visit Clean Hotels.com

Categories
Abortion
Eminent Domain
General
Homosexual Agenda
AFL-CIO
Boy Scouts
Public Health
In The News
Marriage
News Releases
Pornography
Public Schools and Universities
Religious Freedom
Religious Heritage

Click here to complain to the FCC